Louisiana Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1860

It is our bounden duty either in times of prosperity or adversity, to bow down in humble submission to the chastening manifestations and decrees of Divine Providence, and to acknowledge the inscrutable wisdom and justness of His decrees — it now becomes us, after a season of general good health and comparative prosperity to recognize the same All-wise power and the Supreme Source of all blessings and enjoyments.

And as it has been customary in this State to observe a day of public Thanksgiving, therefore, I have thought proper to recommend that Thursday, 29th Day of November next, be set apart for that purpose, and suggest to persons of all creeds and denominations, the propriety of suspending on that day their usual business avocations, that it may be dedicated exclusively to the worship of Almighty God.

Given under my hand and the seal of the State, this 17th day of October, 1860, and of the Independence of the United States of America.

Thomas O. Moore.
Governor of Louisiana

The Infidel’s Sermon to the Pirates

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892) spins an interesting tale of an Infidel, masquerading as a minister of the gospel, constrained by an island of pirates to preach a sermon. The Word of God proves “sharper than any two edged sword.” The story reminds me that the Bible’s unfailing truth does not depend on the skill of the speaker. The gospel itself stands as the “power of God unto salvation.”

A native of Sweden who had imbibed infidel views, had occasion to go from one port to another in the Baltic Sea. When he came to the place whence he expected to sail, the vessel was gone. On inquiring, he found a fishing boat going the same way, in which he embarked. After being for some time out to sea, the men observing that he had several trunks and chests on board, concluded he must be very rich, and therefore agreed among themselves to throw him overboard. This he heard them express, which gave him great uneasiness. However, he took occasion to open one of his trunks, which contained some books. Observing this, they remarked among themselves that it was not worth while to throw him into the sea, as they did not want any books, which they supposed were all the trunks contained. They asked him if he were a priest. Hardly knowing what reply to make them, he told them he was; and at this they seemed much pleased, and said they would have a sermon on the next day, as it was the Sabbath. This increased the anxiety and distress of his mind, for he knew himself to be as incapable of such an undertaking as it was possible for any one to be, as he knew very little of the Scriptures; neither did he believe in the inspiration of the Bible.

At great length they came to a small rocky island, perhaps a quarter of a mile in circumference, where was a company of pirates, who had chosen this little sequestered spot to deposit their treasures. He was taken to a cave, and introduced to an old woman, to whom they remarked that they were to have a sermon preached the next day. She said she was very glad of it, for she had not heard the Word of God for a great while. His was a trying case, for preach he must; still he knew nothing about preaching. If he refused, or undertook to preach and did not please, he expected it would be his death. With these thoughts he passed a sleepless night; and in the morning his mind was not settled upon anything. To call upon God, whom he believed to be inaccessible, was altogether vain. He could devise no way whereby he might be saved. He walked to and fro, still shut up in darkness striving to collect something to say to them, but could not think of even a single sentence.

When the appointed time for the service arrived, he entered the cave, where he found the men assembled. There was a seat prepared for him, and a table with a Bible on it. They sat for the space of half an hour in profound silence; and even then the anguish of his soul was as great as human nature was capable of enduring. At length these words came to his mind: “Verily, there is a reward for the righteous: verily, there is a God that judgeth in the earth.” He arose and delivered them; then others words presented themselves, and so on, till his understanding became opened, and his heart enlarged in a manner astonishing to himself. He spoke upon subject suited to their condition; the reward of the righteous, the judgments of the wicked, the necessity of repentance, and the importance of a change of life. The matchless love of God to the children of men had such a powerful effect upon the minds of these wretched beings, that they were melted into tears. Nor was he less astonished at the unbounded goodness of Almighty God, in thus interposing to save his spiritual as well as his natural life; and well might he exclaim, “This is the Lord’s doing and marvellous in our eyes.” Under a deep sense of God’s goodness, his heart became filled with thankfulness, which it was out of his power to express. What a marvellous change was thus suddenly brought about by Divine interposition! He who a little while before disbelieved in communion with God and the soul, became as humble as a little child; and they who were so lately meditating on his death, now were filled with love and goodwill towards each other, particularly towards him; manifesting affectionate kindness, and willing to render him all the assistance in their power.

The next morning they fitted out one of their vessels, and conveyed him whither he desired. From that time he became a changed man; from being a slave to the influence of infidelity, he was brought to be a sincere believer in the power and efficacy of the truth as it is in Jesus.

[How marvellous the providence of God, and the sovereignty of his grace! Who is he that has stepped beyond the range of Almighty love? or has sinned too much to be forgiven? Reader! are you an infidel? What would you do in a similar situation? What other doctrine than that of Scripture would benefit pirates? Certainly not your own. What would you like to teach your own children? Certainly not your own sentiments. You feel that you would not wish to hear your own offspring blaspheming God. Moreover, forgive us, if we declare our opinion that thou knowest that there is a God, though with thy lips thou deniest him. Think, we beseech thee, of thy Maker, and of his Son, the Saviour; and may Eternal love bring even thee to the Redeemer.

-By Charles Spurgeon

The Church Book

“I can worship God on my own,” he said. “I do not need the church as a crutch to help me in my spiritual life. If I want to know what God says, I have the Bible right here. I do not need anyone telling me what the Bible says. I can read it, study it, and learn it on my own. I have a personal relationship with Jesus.”

I do not know how many times I have heard this idea expressed by those who shun church attendance and corporate worship. The idea runs contrary to the Bibles teachings. Those who say they can read the Bible on their own, and do not need the church, must not be doing so. If they did, the Bible would drive them to church. The Bible is a church book.

If you open the Bible to the gospels and read the words of Jesus himself, you will see that the Son of God says, “I will build my church, and the gates of hell will not prevail against it.” (Matthew 16:18) The entire Book of Acts stands as a testimony to the growth of the church as it spread from “Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.” (Acts 1:8). You can’t read the Book of James and adhere to its words without the church (James 5:13). When you open the Bible, the church spills out.

The majority of the New Testament is comprised of letters written by the Apostle Paul to churches. In the opening of several of these letters he explicitly names the church to whom he addresses. For example, “The Church of God that is in Corinth” (1 Corinthians 1:2 & 2 Corinthians 1:2), “The Church of the Thessalonians” (1 Thessalonians 1:1 & 2 Thessalonians 1:1), and the “Churches of Galatia” Galatians 1:2. When Paul closes the letter to the Romans, he sends a greeting from “the whole church” (Romans 16:23). Even in Paul’s short little letter to Philemon, he specifically addresses the church that meets in his house (Philemon 2).

When Paul writes to individuals, Timothy and Titus, the full content of the letters involves the operation of the church. He tells Timothy, the pastor of the Church in Ephesus, how important it is for a pastor to care for “God’s Church” (1 Timothy 3:5) and gives him explicit guidelines on how to do so. Paul’s letter to Titus reads like a church planting instruction manual as Titus oversees the planting of new churches on the island of Crete (Titus 1:5).

When Paul writes to the Church at Ephesus, he explains that God’s plan of self revelation floes through the church (Ephesians 3:10). When he writes to the church at Philippi he commends and thanks the church for their partnership (Philippians 4:15). When he writes to the Church at Colossae he reminds them that Christ is the head and the church is his body Colossians 1:18. So seeking a relationship with Christ apart from the church is like trying to decapitate Jesus.

The entire Bible speaks of believers in community with others. The author of the Book of Hebrews writes, “Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.” (Hebrews 10:24-25) So like author Wayne Mack said, “Attempting to grow in Christ outside the church is like trying to swim without ever getting into the pool.”

The Bible ends with The Book of Revelation which is written to seven churches (Revelation 1:4) and in the last chapter Jesus says, “I, Jesus, have sent my angel to testify to you about these things for the churches.” (Revelation 22:16) The Bible, from beginning to end is a church book. How could anyone claim to read the Bible, and walk away without hearing the Word of God pointing him to the church?

Lead On, O King Eternal

1. Lead on, O King eternal,
The day of march has come;
Henceforth in fields of conquest
Thy tents shall be our home:
Thro’ days of preparation
Thy grace has made us strong,
And now, O King Eternal,
We lift our battle song.

2. Lead on, O King Eternal,
Till sin’s fierce war shall cease,
And holiness shall whisper
The sweet amen of peace;
For not with swords’ loud clashing,
Or roll of stirring drums;
With deeds of love and mercy
The heav’nly kingdom comes.

3. Lead on, O King eternal,
We follow not with fears;
For gladness breaks like morning
Where’er Thy face appears;
Thy cross is lifted o’er us;
We journey in its light:
The crown awaits the conquest;
Lead on, O God of might.

– Ernest Warburton

The Church

  1. The church is the only institution that our Lord promised to build and to bless (Matt. 16:18).
  2. The church is the gathering place of true worshippers (Phil. 3:3).
  3. The church is the most precious assembly on earth since Christ purchased it with His own blood (Acts 20:28; 1 Cor. 6:19; Eph. 5:25; Col. 1:20; 1 Pet. 1:18; Rev. 1:5).
  4. The church is the earthly expression of the heavenly reality (Matt. 6:10; 18:18).
  5. The church will ultimately triumph both universally and locally (Matt. 16:18; Phil. 1:6).
  6. The church is the realm of spiritual fellowship (Heb. 10:22-25; 1 John 1:3, 6-7).
  7. The church is the proclaimer and protector of divine truth (1 Tim. 3:15; Titus 2:1, 15).
  8. The church is the chief place for spiritual edification and growth (Acts 20:32; Eph. 4:11-16; 2 Tim. 3:16-17; 1 Pet. 2:1-2; 2 Pet. 3:18).
  9. The church is the launching pad for world evangelization (Mark 16:15; Titus 2:11).
  10. The church is the environment where strong spiritual leadership develops and matures (2 Tim. 2:2).19

from Ed Stetzer ComeBack Churches